Adobe Moves All of Its Open Source Projects to Sourceforge

Becomes the first customer of Sourceforge's new developers platform

  Adobe is moving all of its open-source projects to Open@Adobe hosted by Sourceforge
Adobe has announced that its partnering with Sourceforge to expand its open-source offerings and have more flexibility with the related programs. Basically, all of Adobe’s open-source and standards efforts will be hosted and managed on Sourceforge through the site’s new developer platform. Adobe is actually the first customer of the newly launched platform.

Adobe has grouped all of its ‘openess’ programs, source code hosting, specifications and contributions to standards organizations, under the Open@Adobe banner. The new site is now live over at sourceforge.net/adobe.

Today, Adobe in partnership with SourceForge announced the opening of Open@Adobe, the first instantiation of SourceForge's new developer platform,” Dave McAllister, Director of Open Source and Standards at Adobe, wrote in a blog post.

We spent a lot of time looking at various solutions. One thing became clear, that to be involved in open source meant being open to as many people as possible. For Adobe, open means being involved in many aspects of technology, standards, specifications, community, content and source. Our solution needed to include all of these elements. So, in short, we did want the ability to do more than just code,” he explained the choice.

Adobe says Sourceforge was chosen as it enabled the company to do all of the things it wanted in the space and also provided it with enough flexibility and control. The fact that Sourceforge is still one of the biggest and best known open source project hosts in the world probably helped. The company says that this doesn’t mean that Adobe is giving up on its open-source projects, quite the contrary.

For Sourceforge, the new open-source software development platform is a way of entering the enterprise market. The offering provides companies with greater flexibility than what Sourceforge normally allows, but comes with all of the regular tools you’d expect, like a bug tracker, wiki, and source code management and discussion system.

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By    15 Jul 2010, 09:29 GMT