Heidi Montag Set to Change Pop Music with ‘Superficial’ Album

Material drops, critics are far from convinced

  Heidi Montag drops “Superficial,” thinks album will reinvent pop music as we know it
Heidi Montag, the reality star who, not long ago, came under serious fire with music critics for what could only be called a very dubious performance at the Miss Universe beauty pageant, has just released her much-hyped and oft-delayed album, “Superficial.” Costing over $2 million of her own money and representing the fruit of 3 years of labor, the album will undoubtedly write history by reinventing pop music, Montag believes, as she states in an interview with EW’s The Music-Mix.

Montag is not exactly known for her vocal abilities, many a music critic saying that she’s completely tone deaf and, what’s perhaps worse, utterly torn from reality. However, if determination means anything in terms of the outcome of a project, then “Superficial” might actually turn out to be a hit with music lovers, since Heidi invested plenty of money and effort into it, not to mention that she literally poured her soul into every song included on it. If only because of this, she expects the album to sell about $2 million in the first week of release alone, recouping her initial investment.

Even if that doesn’t happen (hypothetically speaking, of course), Heidi will not be discouraged, she says. Making music is, for her, more than just a passing whim: she does it because she loves it and, understandably, because she’s convinced she’s talented enough not only to make a buck out of it, but to literally write music history. And this is exactly the goal she’s set for “Superficial”: to reinvent pop music and establish herself as an artist for whom the constant negativity is nothing but an incentive more to prove her worth.

“I did it [recorded the album] independently. If you look back at the superstars throughout history it used to take that long to put albums together. Now it’s more manufactured. I really wanted to take my time, and every song means so much to me. And every song was a true journey. I had to track down the songs myself, because it was just Spencer and I doing it independently. We really took our time with every single process, because we wanted it to be the highest quality possible. I wanted it to be back to the ‘Thriller days,’ to that kind of sound. It’s timeless music, so whenever it comes out was the right timing,” Montag says when asked of why it took her 3 years to come out with an album.

Timeless or not, we might as well note that critics are far from impressed. Montag calls her first single, “I’ll Do It” “empowering,” Gawker chooses to say it’s just “gross.” “[It] is so gross I’m starting to second-guess even the non-gross parts,” the publication writes. “As for what kind of music ‘I’ll Do It’ is, well, it’s pretty much what you’d expect: pin-the-tail-on-the-loser disco music – the sort of music you will be able to purchase, in the near future, in a foil container at any convenience store in any foul neighborhood in town. You then stick the foil Montag song into the cheese-stained microwave and pop to nifty readiness!” The Day also says in a cutting review.

To know which one to believe, that is Montag herself vs. the critics, listen to “I’ll Do It” below and make up your own mind. 


1 Comment

By    14 Jan 2010, 08:59 GMT