Nadya Suleman Put Octuplets at Risk, Medical Board Rules

Together with the fertility doctor that helped her get pregnant

  Medical Board of California says Nadya Suleman and fertility doctor put octuplets at risk
After an entire year of negative media and unofficial complaints from taxpayers on various forums, the Medical Board of California is recommending that the fertility doctor that helped Nadya Suleman get pregnant with octuplets be disciplined. At the same time, the Board says Suleman put her own kids at risk by asking to have the procedure done, TMZ has learned.

The Board is recommending that Michael Kamrava, the physician in charge of Suleman’s case, have his license revoked or suspended for signing up his patient for repeated in vitro procedures, despite the fact that her case was clearly a special one. In other words, Kamrava is guilty of negligence for agreeing to artificially inseminate Suleman since her very request should have raised some question marks as to her state of mind, it is being said.

“The Medical Board of California says Octomom Nadya Suleman ‘was placing her offspring at risk for potential harm.’ The Board is recommending that Michael Kamrava, the fertility doctor who artificially inseminated Suleman, be disciplined because he acted with ‘gross negligence’ with regard to her treatment. The Board concluded, ‘His failure to recognize that [Suleman’s] behavior was outside the norm and that her conduct was placing her offspring at risk for potential harm’,” TMZ writes.

As of now, neither the doctor in question nor Suleman has been available for comment. OctoMom, as she came to be known in the media after she gave birth to octuplets in January last year, said in a couple of interviews that she later came to understand that her desire to have so many children, when she already had another 6 at home in her care, though she did not have a proper income, was wrong. She even went as far as to call the octuplets a “mistake,” for which reason she got even more heat in the US press.

All this time, she only wanted people to love her. “When I came home, I thought people would love me, but I was getting hate mail and death threats. I just cried and cried. I don’t take money from the state and I have to put food on the table. My costs are enormous. I can’t go out and get a conventional job because my babies need me here. So the one thing I can sell is them but if I do that, people attack me. I have help and I do my best. You can’t undo what I have done. The babies are here. I just have to get on,” Suleman was saying in an interview of a few months ago, as we also reported at the time.

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By    5 Jan 2010, 10:48 GMT