New Un-Retouched Photos of Madonna for D&G Are Out

  Madonna for Dolce & Gabbana, after and before Photoshop
Madonna is no stranger to Photoshop, word in the blogosphere has it, but one might have expected Dolce & Gabbana to have a tighter security because their “before” photos have leaked online again.

Madonna is no stranger to Photoshop, word in the blogosphere has it, but one might have expected Dolce & Gabbana to have a tighter security because their “before” photos have leaked online again.

As fans must know, this is not the first time that photos of Madonna from various campaigns end up online before they’re retouched, but that doesn’t make this latest occurrence any less regrettable.

As E! Online can confirm, the difference between the before and after pics are quite striking, especially if one looks at the singer’s arms.

Madonna arguably has the arms with the most definition out of all the female celebrities out there, while also being very veiny, which is perhaps why she’s wearing gloves on the red carpet as of late.

“Security is seriously lacking over at Dolce & Gabbana headquarters. For the umpteenth time, another set of unretouched photos from the brand’s spring / summer ad campaign with Madonna was leaked online,” E! writes.

“And it’s not pretty...” the same e-zine notes, especially if one looks at her hands and arms. Her face is ironically enough pretty much perfect – better than that of a 20-year-old.

That promo pics are most usually retouched is no longer a secret for anyone, yet many wish D&G would simply stop selling absurd fantasies like the finished photos of Madonna.

No one’s saying some Photoshop is not good (for business and the celebrity’s ego), but from this to that is quite a stretch – especially, as E! notes, the “before” pics are definitely more relatable.

“But you know what? We kind of prefer it that way,” says the celebrity gossip publication.

“The raw image on the left – with the veins, crazy muscle definition and wrinkles – makes the Material Girl human, and is much more interesting than the ho-hum airbrushed and pretty pic on the right,” E! further says.

As it happens, E! is not alone in thinking this: more and more voices online are saying some brands take Photoshop too much with their ad campaigns.

Some truth in them wouldn’t harm anyone, it is being said.

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By    1 Oct 2010, 17:31 GMT