Pros and Cons for Brushing the Hair 100 Times a Day

Hairstylists say we should forget about the “100 brush strokes” rule

  Avoid over-brushing your hair

One of the things all girls hear ever since childhood is that the hair, especially if long, must be brushed many, many times a day. Only by doing this does the hair strengthen and become smooth and shiny. However, other voices are now chiming in, stating exactly the opposite – if you care about your scalp and your hair, the last thing you need to do is damage and weaken it by such “barbarian” methods.

 

All the believers in this “myth” are convinced that lots of brushing or combing, both in the morning and at night, can stimulate the scalp to produce sebum, essential oils that would eventually reach the ends of the hairs. The result would be a healthier, softer hair, with no split ends. Some even say that the roots of the hair may eventually become stronger and, consequently, hair loss would be diminished.

 

On the other hand, history provides e great deal of arguments supporting the other “side,” which is why the opponents of the theory consider that those traditional “100 brush strokes” should be a matter of the past. Since our daily hair care includes a large variety of products especially designed to maintain and even increase our hair's health, there's no need now to delude ourselves we’d get the same results by over-brushing. On top of that, all the oil and other impurities that would make it impossible for our scalp to “breathe” properly can be removed by shampooing and using a conditioner.

 

The “100 strokes” method might have worked centuries ago, when people, and women in particular, would wash the hair only once a month. Lucky for us, this is no longer the case now. All the beauty products currently available are meant to take care of our hair all year round, with awesome results.

 

Despite the divided opinions on the matter, that's one little aspect where they all agree - what you definitely must not do is comb or brush the hair when it is still wet. That's when the hair ends are three times weaker than usually, and thus easier to damage. 

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By    28 Nov 2008, 08:12 GMT