Windows Vista Home Basic vs. Home Premium vs. Business vs. Ultimate

Microsoft handicapped comparison

By on 20 Aug 2007, 16:42 GMT
Microsoft applauded shipping in excess of 60 million Windows Vista licenses in the operating system's first six months of general availability. However, the Redmond company is right on track to correct this little slip up. Windows Vista will not continue to sell this well, at least not if Microsoft can help it. Just take a look at the handicapped comparison graphic included towards the bottom of this article, courtesy of the U.S. Vista Business official webpage. Now, in the past it has been demonstrated that Microsoft did not know its own operating system. That was of course in Canada, but still, it appears that ignorance is contagious and that state borders are no boundaries, or impediments.

It's beyond me why Microsoft is doing itself a disservice, but the company does excel in putting together some Wow-less comparisons between its main editions. Case in point: Windows Vista Home Basic vs. Home Premium vs. Business vs. Ultimate. Well... as far as the accuracy, the compelling argument made by the graphic, the marketing insight, the deep knowledge of its latest operating system, the exemplary resources, features and capabilities chosen to advertise the Vista editions, I have only one thing to say about the comparison... I really like the nuances of blue. I do think that they could have gone with turquoise instead, and that it would have proven a better choice, but hey, nobody's perfect and Microsoft excels in its flaw fiesta.

The comparison itself is obviously a complete strike out. Well... if the point was to underline that there is little to no difference between Vista Home Basic and Home Premium and between the Business and Ultimate editions, then Microsoft got it absolutely right. Otherwise, the Redmond company really, really drives nothing home... The main differences between Home Basic and Home Premium seem to be Windows Aero, Tablet PC capabilities, Windows Meeting Space, Windows SideShow and the ability to easily set up a network projector. Get your five Vista features for just $40! Because that's the gap that separates the $199 Home Basic and $239 Home Premium. And I have yet to see users convinced to upgrade to Vista because of Vista Aero and the SideShow.

But with Business and Ultimate, Microsoft is not even trying. The Business edition seems not to have Windows BitLocker Drive Encryption and the subsystem for Unix-based applications, and a price tag a whole $100 smaller than that of Ultimate. I understand that the webpage is focused on Vista Business, but why is Microsoft creating user confusion in order to bring just one edition of the platform into the limelight? The bottom line is that Microsoft should present customers with all the data available and catalyze an informed choice, not educate them with a poor excuse for a comparison.

Photo Gallery (2 Images)

Gallery Image
01
Gallery Image
02

3 Comments